New York Fashion Week: Favorites & Trends

While New York Fashion Week was just over two weeks ago, it feels like I’m already far behind the times posting this review now.  But such is the world of fashion, especially during fashion month.  It’s an understatement to say things move quickly.

My lateness aside, I wanted to post this to review some pieces and collections that stood out to me, both to highlight clothes I might wear and those few designers that took interesting risks.  I have to agree with the top fashion editors that not enough collections felt risky or new this season.  I can respect that the world of fashion is undergoing significant changes at the moment — in the social media driven world, everyone wants to have the most Instagramable collection and consumers want what they’re seeing photos of now, which is why many designers are choosing to offer see-now buy-now collections.

A collection that is too risky, that introduces a too-new silhouette, that pushes consumers ideas about what beauty can look like too much is likely to sell less than something that meets existing expectations and comfort zones.  And financial risk aside, we’ve seen so much fast change in fashion in the last half-century — from A-lines to miniskirts, from dramatic flares to tight cigarette pants — it can feel like we’ve seen it all already, and that everything new is simply a rehash.  Strictly speaking, that is and isn’t true.  All art is a reference to previous art; it has to be.  In that view, nothing is new and yet, everything is.

This is a very substantial post as New York Fashion Week is an enormous topic.  You can use the following links to jump ahead: Trends (90s70sCelebrityCollectionsCutoutsCulottesFringeGradientsKnitsLurexMarijuanaPatchesRuffles); Favorites (for aesthetic & for wearability).

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Marriage Equality, Pride, & Refusing to Be Invisible

NYC Pride as seen looking east on 5th Ave, between 12th and 13th St.

A few weekends ago, a couple friends and I went to the NYC Pride Parade.  It had been ten years since I had been to an LGBT event.  I’m not afraid of being out, nor am I suffering from internalized homophobia, but I do get exhausted by the internal politics of gay culture, and for awhile it was less uplifting and more frustrating to participate.

This year we had more than our usual annual pride.  We saw an undeniably historic SCOTUS decision.  I remember well when gay marriage was legalized in my home state of Massachusetts — I was 12 years old, had recently come out (or rather, been outed), and I ended up writing a paper for my English class on the issue.  At the time of writing said paper, I saw the issue, and the community, as fairly black and white.  Gay people and straight allies were categorically good — it was the kind of immature and dichotomous thinking that is characteristic of young teenagers (and that we see so often in Tumblr-brand slacktivism).  Later that same school year I attended my first pride parade in Northampton.  And it was one of the most depressing days of my young life.  The participants were all very homogenous: butch-adjacent lesbian couples in hiking mandals with young children.  The parade was for gay marriage and gay adoption rights.  It was — and there’s really no other word for it — conservative.

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Weather Integrated into Wallpaper: A GeekTool Widget for Mac OS

geektoolweather

You will need:

GeekTool is an application available for Mac OS that allows the user to create widgets embedded in their desktop.  These widgets commonly display time, date, to do lists, weather information, and images.  I’ve played with GeekTool on and off over the years — sometimes using it for practical reasons, like an easily visible record of uptime on older machines, and sometimes for frivolous ones, like the GeekTool I’m going to share with you today.

While displaying weather widgets with images is a common GeekTool, I have yet to see one integrated into a desktop image, so I decided to give it a try.  To accomplish this, you’ll needed to use two GeekTools, one image and one shell.  I used two small scripts, one written in bash and the other a line in python, but you could easily write all of this in one script, splitting it up was just faster for me in the moment.

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